Book Review

The Lines Between Us by Amy Lynn Green

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to participate in my very first cover reveal! Amy Lynn Green’s novel was one I was eagerly anticipating, and helping her with the reveal was just icing on the cake! (Check out my reveal post here!) When The Lines Between Us was released in August, I was beyond excited to finally get my hands on this most-anticipated read! And the best news? This new novel is just as amazing as it looks and sounds.

About The Lines Between Us:

(From the publisher): A WWII novel of courage and conviction, based on the true experience of the men who fought fires as conscientious objectors and the women who fought prejudice to serve in the Women’s Army Corps.

Since the attack on Pearl Harbor, Gordon Hooper and his buddy Jack Armitage have stuck to their values as conscientious objectors. Much to their families’ and country’s chagrin, they volunteer as smokejumpers rather than enlisting, parachuting into and extinguishing raging wildfires in Oregon. But the number of winter blazes they’re called to seems suspiciously high, and when an accident leaves Jack badly injured, Gordon realizes the facts don’t add up.

A member of the Women’s Army Corps, Dorie Armitage has long been ashamed of her brother’s pacifism, but she’s shocked by news of his accident. Determined to find out why he was harmed, she arrives at the national forest under the guise of conducting an army report . . . and finds herself forced to work with Gordon. He believes it’s wrong to lie; she’s willing to do whatever it takes for justice to be done. As they search for clues, Gordon and Dorie must wrestle with their convictions about war and peace and decide what to do with the troubling secrets they discover.

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Somedays we all need a little encouragement. And these 9 motherhood memes will give you all the feels! Packed with inspiration and love for the busy mama, they are too sweet not to share. Because this season may be physically draining… but our hearts? They’ve never been fuller.

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Book Review

Yours is the Night by Amanda Dykes

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Last year, I received a copy of Amanda Dykes book, “Set the Stars Alight” and I fell in love. (If you haven’t read it, go order a copy here!) So when I heard that Yours is the Night was coming out this year, it quickly became one of my most anticipated reads of 2021. Now, the problem with most anticipated reads is that sometimes, you hype them up so much in your head beforehand, that when you actually read the book, it pales in comparison. But let me tell you, this was NOT a problem with Yours is the Night. This book completely met all my expectations for a beautiful story full of hope and light.

Amanda writes in a way that is lyrical and magical. Her words chip away at the darkness and spill light through the cracks and crevices of the characters’ broken stories. I’m not the type of reader to highlight sentences in novels, but if I was, this book would be filled. There were so many times I had to stop and simply soak in the beauty of a phrase or paragraph. (Keep reading for the rest of my review!)

About Yours is the Night:

(From the publisher) The trenches of the Great War are a shadowed place. Though Platoon Sergeant Matthew Petticrew arrived there with a past long marked by shadow, the realities of battle bring new wounds–carving within him a longing for light, and a resolve to fight for it.

One night, Matthew and his comrades are enraptured by a sound so pure, a voice so ethereal, it offers reprieve–even if only for a moment. Soon, rumors sweep the trenches from others who have heard the lullaby too. “The Angel of Argonne,” they call the voice: a mysterious presence who leaves behind wreaths on unmarked graves.

Raised in the wild depths of the Forest of Argonne, Mireilles finds her reclusive world rocked when war crashes into her idyllic home, taking much from her. When Matthew and his two unlikely companions discover Mireilles, they must embark on a journey that will change each of them forever . . . and perhaps, at long last, spark light into the dark.

On the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier comes an emotive tale inspired by the courageous soldiers of World War I.

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Book Review

The Moonlight School by Suzanne Woods Fisher

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

About The Moonlight School:

Moonlight School book cover

(From the publisher) Haunted by personal tragedy, Lucy Wilson arrives in Rowan County, Kentucky. It’s the spring of 1911 and she’s there to assist her cousin, Cora Wilson Stewart, superintendent of schools. A fish out of water, Lucy is appalled by the primitive conditions and intellectual poverty she encounters.

Born in those very hills, Cora knows the twin plagues of illiteracy and poverty. So does Brother Wyatt, a singing school master who travels through the hills. Involving Lucy and Wyatt, Cora hatches a plan to open the schoolhouses to adults on moonlit nights. The best way to combat poverty, she believes, is to eliminate illiteracy. But will the people come?

As Lucy emerges from a life in the shadows, she finds purpose, along with something else she hadn’t expected: love.

Inspired by true events, this novel from bestselling author Suzanne Woods Fisher brings to life the story that shocked the nation into taking adult literacy seriously.

The Moonlight School book set on open journal with white background

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Reader’s Thoughts

The Moonlight School had me intrigued from the start. Having recently read another book set in Kentucky dealing with the topic of illiteracy, I was excited to see Fisher’s take. Although it took longer than expected to get to the actual “moonlight school” aspect, I loved that this was based on true story. And as an avid bookworm, the topic of literacy is obviously dear to my heart.

The story itself is sweet and full of charm. The book follows Lucy — a young and fairly naïve, city girl. Asked to assist her cousin as a stenographer, Lucy is shocked by the poor conditions she encounters in Rowan County. But as time passes, she discovers the rich and beautiful history and culture within the hills. This personal transformation was well done and I grew to really enjoy her character.

I also adored Finley James and Angie. These teen characters were a really fun way to bring about some of the personality of the mountain people, while weaving in some levity. As for the other characters, I really appreciate when Christian fiction takes the time to set up romantic relationships in an authentic way, and I think the author was able to achieve that here.

While the book touches upon deep poverty, the story is still kept fairly light. For me, this meant missing some of the reality that I was looking for. I do, however, think this would make a great read for teens too. These are the sorts of stories my young heart grew up on. It’s clean, lighthearted and has great historical context.

If you enjoy Christian fiction with lovely characters, a little romance, and a few twists along the way, I think you’ll enjoy The Moonlight School! Want to grab a copy for yourself? You can find The Moonlight School on Amazon here!

**Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group
and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.
 All opinions expressed are my own.